Thursday’s Special: Pepezela! Yebo! i.e. Get me out of here! Yes!

Regina is a Ferruginous Buzzard that found its home on the hamlet of Vezio overhanging Varenna on the shores of Lake Como in Italy.

She spends most of her time caged in, and that’s where I found her on a late Summer afternoon screaming her lungs out and begging to be let go….  

 

 

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Pepezela! Yebo! (Zulu for Get me out of here! Yes! – listen to the attached track)

**About Thursday’s Special: It is a new ‘non-challenge’ challenge that appeals to bloggers eager to wake up their creativity and show their own ideas and interpretation of the world. I invite everybody interested to join in. There are no themes, titles and techniques set for your expression, there are no limits and restrictions (no red tape whatsoever). The only thing required is to post a photo post on Thursdays entitled “Thursday’s Special: (your theme/title)” (as explained in my Thursday’s Special introductory post), to provide a link to my Thursday’s Special post, and to leave a link to your post in the comments section of my post. If you like Thursday’s Special widget, feel free to grab it and post it on your blog.

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Check out other entries for Thursday’s Special: 

 

Thursday’s Special: A Short Man, a Tall Woman, and a Dog aka Passeggiata

 
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**About Thursday’s Special: It is a new ‘non-challenge’ challenge that appeals to bloggers eager to wake up their creativity and show their own ideas and interpretation of the world. I invite everybody interested to join in. There are no themes, titles and techniques set for your expression, there are no limits and restrictions (no red tape whatsoever). The only thing required is to post a photo post on Thursdays entitled “Thursday’s Special: (your theme/title)” (as explained in my Thursday’s Special introductory post), to provide a link to my Thursday’s Special post, and to leave a link to your post in the comments section of my post. If you like Thursday’s Special widget, feel free to grab it and post it on your blog.

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Check out other inspiring entries for Thursday’s Special:

 

Thursday’s Special: Vegged Out

 

 

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Not long ago I posted this same photo in B&W. Many of you thought it was a rose, but the object I photographed is rosette-shaped selenite gypsum that can be found in the deserts of Morocco and Algeria. Owing to its appearance, it is popularly called a desert rose. It is born in a process of moisture condensation when selenite huddles together and creates a mass that is subjected to the elements around it, and through sand and wind erosion.

The etymology of the word selenite shows that it came from Middle English selinete, from Latin selenites i.e. from Greek selēnitēs (lithos), which literally means moonstone or stone of the moon, from selēnē (Moon). The ancients used to believe that certain transparent crystals waxed and waned with the moon. In Greek mythology “Selene” is known as the goddess of the moon.

Selenite gypsum is a stone of the mind, said to bring mental ability and clarity, as well as perception of all kinds, including intuitive perception. It is used in crystal healing to quiet worries and still the mind from distractions and disruptions.

The above abstract does not show the true colour of the desert rose; desert roses take on the colour of the sand because selenite is a fibrous mineral and fine sand becomes trapped between the fibres as it crystallizes. When I did the colour editing on this photo I thought it would be fun to make it look like kale.

I hope you will enjoy the attached music as well.

**About Thursday’s Special: It is a new ‘non-challenge’ challenge that appeals to bloggers eager to wake up their creativity and show their own ideas and interpretation of the world. I invite everybody interested to join in. There are no themes, titles and techniques set for your expression, there are no limits and restrictions (no red tape whatsoever). The only thing required is to post a photo post on Thursdays entitled “Thursday’s Special: (your theme/title)” (as explained in my Thursday’s Special introductory post), to provide a link to my Thursday’s Special post, and to leave a link to your post in the comments section of my post. If you like Thursday’s Special widget, feel free to grab it and post it on your blog.

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Check out inspiring entries for Thursday’s Special: 

Thursday’s Post: Sitting Pretty

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Chairs accompany us in our everyday life. I have recently calculated the average amount of time I spend in a chair on a working day, and was astounded to find out that it was nothing less than thirteen hours. I am sure that most of you that lead a sedentary lifestyle with office jobs have more or less the same average. It does seem absurd that this piece of furniture is the most prevalent constant in our daily routine.

When did this happen? How did the chair find its way into our lives?

The first chair was invented in Ancient Egypt and was later perfected by Ancient Greeks. In early cultures most people sat on logs or stools, whereas chairs with seat, four legs and a back were reserved for privileged members of the society. The word chair was derived from Latin cathedra ”seat“ i.e. from Ancient Greek kathedra (chair of a teacher, throne). In modern languages the word “cathedra“ has been preserved to designate a seat of a bishop or an official chair of a professor. Hence the word cathedral which means a church into which a bishop’s official cathedra is installed.

The word chair in today’s English does not only denote a piece of furniture that is indispensable object in our daily life; it is also used figuratively in expressions: the first chair – second chair, chairman (chairperson) etc.

What would our lives without chairs be like?

I know I would be lost, if someone was to take my armchair away. As a result, I would probably develop some abdominal and back muscles, but I know that I would not be able to spend as much time on my computer. If it weren’t for chairs, I would probably sit on meadows with my back leaned against a tree trunk and smell the freshness of a forest instead of smelly people in my office.

Well, it may not be such a bad idea after all. 😉

The above photo shows two marvelous chairs I used to sit pretty on my holidays.

The ”Sitting Pretty“ post is dedicated to Sophia of Sonel’s corner. A while ago she encouraged me to look at furniture differently ;).

**About Thursday’s Special: It is a new ‘non-challenge’ challenge that appeals to bloggers eager to wake up their creativity and show their own ideas and interpretation of the world. I invite everybody interested to join in. There are no themes, titles and techniques set for your expression, there are no limits and restrictions (no red tape whatsoever). The only thing required is to post a photo post on Thursdays entitled “Thursday’s Special: (your theme/title)” (as explained in my Thursday’s Special introductory post), to provide a link to my Thursday’s Special post, and to leave a link to your post in the comments section of my post. If you like Thursday’s Special widget, feel free to grab it and post it on your blog.

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Check out the other entries: 

Thursday’s Special: Earthly Paradise

 
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The etymology of the word garden shows that it came into the English language in c. 1300 from Old North French gardin (Modern French jardin subsequently entered Italian, Spanish and Portuguese as giardinojardin and jardim), which was derived from Vulgar Latin “hortus gardinus” meaning enclosed garden. The Frankish word for garden was gardo, from Proto-Germanic gardaz, (Old High German gard, gart meaning an enclosure or compound, appears in the name of the town Stuttgart). The Proto-Slavic word gord for fortified settlement which later evolved into grad and means town or city, can be seen in many Slavic toponyms such as in the older name for St Petersburg, Petrograd.

Thus the original Latin denominator for garden “hortus gardinus” passed on the second part of the expression “gardinus” meaning “enclosure” to denote garden in modern Germanic and Romance languages, whereas the first part of the term “hortus” which actually means “garden” has been preserved in scholarly terms like horticulture, orchard.

Enclosed, protected (guarded) piece of land, garden is also a cognate of “guard” because defence against two or four-legged varmints is the common concern of both guarding and gardening.

Gardens appeared in the beginnings of Neolithic revolution (approx. 11,500 – 5,000 years ago) when gradual shift from hunting-gathering to farming gave birth to sedentary societies. With the development of early agriculture, social, economic and cultural practices also evolved and led to what is known as civilisation.

Contrary to gardens where nature is subdued, ordered, selected and enclosed, forests are representatives of unorganised, untamed nature where access is not restricted by a deed of ownership, but by mere geography. The garden is a symbol of the soul, and the qualities cultivated in it, a symbol of the consciouss and the female receptive principle as opposed to the adamant forest which can be seen as a symbol of unconscious.

Despite the safety and bountifulness of the garden, the magic of the forest has always had a more alluring quality for me.

Which one would you rather have: a garden with its tamed character and regulated nature, or a forest, unruly and unpredictable?

**About Thursday’s Special: It is a new ‘non-challenge’ challenge that appeals to bloggers eager to wake up their creativity and show their own ideas and interpretation of the world. I invite everybody interested to join in. There are no themes, titles and techniques set for your expression, there are no limits and restrictions (no red tape whatsoever). The only thing required is to post a photo post on Thursdays entitled “Thursday’s Special: (your theme/title)” (as explained in my Thursday’s Special introductory post), to provide a link to my Thursday’s Special post, and to leave a link to your post in the comments section of my post. If you like Thursday’s Special widget, feel free to grab it and post it on your blog.

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Check out the beautiful entries for this week’s Thursday’s Special:

Thursday’s Special: Go Fig(ure)

 

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Common fig also known as just fig or scientifically Ficus Carica is a species of flowering plant belonging to the mulberry family of fruits along with mulberries, breadfruit, and osage orange.

Now, what I wonder about is what makes the common fig so common?

Is it the fact that it is the oldest cultivated fruit on Earth; (scientists have recently discovered that figs had been cultivated for more than 5,000 years when nine carbonized figs were unearthed in the early Neolithic village of Gilgal in Israel); the fact that it is widely spread all over Western Asia, and the Mediterranean coast of both North Africa and Europe, and that it found its way to the Americas, or the fact that its leaf was used throughout art history as a medium of censorship which has its origins in Adam’s and Eve’s expulsion from the Garden of Eden?

Fig is a uniquely nutritious fruit with the highest amount of calcium of any fruit, and it’s an excellent source of dietary fibre, which makes it one of the best natural laxatives; it is an excellent antioxidant that may prevent some types of cancer and according to some recent studies can be used in diabetes prevention too. Its nutritional benefits are abundant, and here is another fact that you may have ignored: fig leaves are surprisingly healthy too; in some cuisines they are used for cooking, as wrappers for fish or meat.

Be as it may, the figurative use of the word fig in many languages suggests that this valuable, though common, fruit has been slighted.

You must have heard or even used the expressions ”not worth a fig“ or “I don’t give a fig“. In Italian “non vale un fico secco“ means ”not worth a dry fig“; in French: “faire la figue à quelqu’un” means to make fun of somebody. The Spanish say “me importa un higo” which is equivalent to the English “I don’t give a fig” etc. The depreciation of figs has crept into my language too, (maybe through Italian), despite the fact that dry figs are a well-known delicacy and are often enjoyed with a glass of grappa – grape brandy.

Can this derision of the fig be attributed to the biblical account of Jesus’ irritation with a fig tree from which he desperately tried to pluck a fruit in April!? Peeved for his fruitless attempt, he then cursed the tree which withered the following day. Shouldn’t he have known better?!

Here is another idea:

May contempt for the fig have its origins in the biblical story of the Garden of Eden, and the tree of knowledge bearing the forbidden fruit, the same fruit that is responsible for Adam’s and Eve’s expulsion from paradise? Scientists are still guessing the identity of the fruit since the traditional depiction of it as apple does not hold water; apples were unknown in Ancient Israel and Bible was never specific about what fruit it was. The fact that apples got associated with Eden only in 500 AD when Bible was first translated into Latin, tells us that it was simply an error of ambiguous translation brought on by Latin homonym malum(us) having two meanings “evil” and “apple”.

Though some scientists guess that the forbidden fruit was the pomegranate considering it was the most cultivated fruit in Ancient Israel, others claim that it was most probably the fig, quoting that a fig leaf was used to cover Adam’s and Eve’s nudity when they were chased out of Eden.

This is one riddle that will probably remain unsolved, but I wish I could figure it out.

**About this post: Thursday’s Special is a new ‘non-challenge’ challenge that appeals to bloggers eager to wake up their creativity and show their own ideas and interpretation of the world. I invite everybody interested to join in. There are no themes, titles and techniques set for your expression, there are no limits and restrictions (no red tape whatsoever). The only thing required is to post a photo post on Thursdays entitled “Thursday’s Special: (your theme/title)” (as explained in my Thursday’s Special introductory post), to provide a link to my Thursday’s Special post, and to leave a link to your post in the comments section of my post. If you like Thursday’s Special widget, feel free to grab it and post it on your blog.

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Check out beautiful entries for Thursday’s Special: 

Thursday’s Special: Silver Lining

This time I went a step further in my photo post; I wasn’t happy with just posting a photo I had taken on my holidays, and enclosing a song, I felt like writing a music review as well.

What follows is a picture I took on my recent holiday in Lugano, Switzerland, which I titled “Silver Lining”. In the bellow text you will find a track by the same title that matches my picture, a musical review of the band’s first album, and details on my Thursday’s Special non-challenge.

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Silver Lining

The two guys (Hutchcraft and Anderson) that are behind the “Silver lining” song met some eight years ago when their friends got involved in a fight in front of one of Manchester’s nightclubs. Too drunk to join in, they started talking about music and realising they had similar tastes, decided to start a band. The band named “Bureau” broke up a year later, only to reappear shortly afterwards under the name “Daggers” that claimed to be responsible for inventing disco lento musical genre. In early 2009 “Daggers” was also disbanded, but later the same year these two Mancunians formed a duo called “Hurts” that has been active ever since.

Their first album “Happiness” released in 2010 best known for the hit song Wonderful Life, contains the song “Silver lining” that I discovered by accident on you tube while searching for a musical accompaniment for my “Silver lining” photo.

Click here to listen:

Now there’s no way back from the things you’ve done
I know it’s too late to stop the setting sun
You see the shadows in the distant light
And it’s never going to be alright
And you know, and you know, and you know I’m right.

The album received positive to mixed reviews from music critics ranging from “an ordinary package of overblown melodies and musty lyrical clichés” or “music that moisturizes a touch too much” to “music that harnesses the 80’s whole underpinning pop ethos, its spirit of expansiveness, its shamelessness, its irony-free faith in the emotive power of a glorious hook”.

After having listened to it several times I can only say that I find the album (this song included) flamboyant, daring, rich with flashes of wit and intelligence; an ultimate ode to the sounds of the 80’s. It is more 80’s than the 80’s themselves.

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**About this post: Thursday’s Special is a new ‘non-challenge’ challenge that appeals to bloggers eager to wake up their creativity and show their own ideas and interpretation of the world. I invite everybody interested to join in. There are no themes, titles and techniques set for your expression, there are no limits and restrictions (no red tape whatsoever). The only thing required is to post a photo post on Thursdays entitled “Thursday’s Special: (your theme/title)” (as explained in my Thursday’s Special introductory post), to provide a link to my Thursday’s Special post, and to leave a link to your post in the comments section of my post. There is also a widget created especially for this non-challenge, so if you like it, feel free to use it when linking to my Thursday’s Special post, or you can just display it in the sidebar on your blog.

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Let me wrap up now with an encouraging quote: “It’s easy to come up with new ideas; the hard part is letting go of what worked for you two years ago, but will soon be out of date.” (Roger von Oech) 😉

Check out the beautiful entries for Thursday’s Special non-challenge:

Thursday’s Special (inspirational photo non-challenge)

I’ve decided to start a new series of photo posts that will be published on Thursdays in honour of Jupiter (or Thor – god from Norse mythology) entitled Thursday’s Special, and I would like you to join me and to share your work with me.
A few facts about Thursday, the origin of the name and the reason why I chose it as the day of my new special posts series:
According to some international standard adopted in most western countries, Thursday is the fourth day of the week. In countries that use the Sunday-first convention, Thursday is defined as the fifth day of the week such as in Portugal where it is called “quinta-feira” meaning fifth day of liturgical celebration (the first being Sunday) after Latin “feria quinta” used in religious texts where it was not allowed to consecrate days to pagan gods. In other Romance languages the name for Thursday was clearly derived from Jupiter such as “jeudi” in French, “giovedi” in Italian, or “jueves” in Spanish. In Slavic languages again the number is used such as in Croatian where “četvrtak” means the fourth day. In Hindi the word for Jupiter is Brhaspati, and Thursday is called Brhaspativar, also known as Guruvar in the South Indian languages.

The name Thursday is derived from Old English Þūnresdæg and Middle English Thuresday, which means “Thor’s day”. And who is Thor if not Jupiter (Latin: Iuppiter, Iūpiter) (also called Jove), in Roman mythology, the god of sky and thunder, the king of all gods. The Planet Jupiter which is visible to the naked eye in the night sky and occasionally in the daytime too when the sun is low, was named after it.

Jovian is the adjectival form of Jupiter. The older adjectival form jovial, employed by astrologers in the Middle Ages, has come to mean “happy” or “merry”, moods ascribed to Jupiter’s astrological influence.
This takes us to the symbolism of Jupiter. Jupiter is said to influence all the good and noble things of life, and lead each of us toward a higher purpose. It reflects the fullness of life and absolute freedom.
With this in mind I’ve decided to dedicate these “sacrificial” posts to Jupiter, a jovial god of light to enlighten us and help us expand.

 

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Jupiter reflected 😉

**This is not a challenge; and there are no rules. I will not be giving you themes, but I am inviting you to share with me what inspires you, and makes you happy. If you like my widget, feel free to use it when linking to Thursday’s Special, or just place it somewhere in the widget area on your blog. If you want to take part, it will bring me great joy.

Addendum: At the beginning of 2015 Thursday’s Special turned into a photo challenge and the participants are given weekly themes every Thursday. In a year and a half of posting this event I realised that bloggers are happier when given specific themes for the challenge. The novelty is that as of January 2015 you are invited to participate as guest challengers on my blog and give themes to others. For more details please see Scheduled Challenges page.  

When you make a post on the given theme, link it to my challenge post and leave a link to your post in the comments section. 

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